When (and How) to Fire an Employee: 7 Signs it’s Time to Terminate

when to fire an employee

No one should ever be surprised to be fired. Unless your company has fallen victim to a pirate-worthy hostile takeover, or a 60 Minutes exposé that brings the villagers with torches and pitchforks, getting fired should never come out of the blue for any employee. Every employee who is terminated should know it’s coming and be ready to take responsibility when it happens. No surprises allowed.

But when is it necessary to fire an employee, and when should companies look for ways to rehabilitate? When separation is necessary, it’s important to do it properly, with respect and dignity. But often when you’re considering letting someone go, you may be missing out on an opportunity to modify problem behavior and salvage an otherwise good staffer. According to Josh Bersin, of Bersin by Deloitte, the time to regain full productivity with a new hire is one to two years, with an investment in that training of up to 20 percent of the employee’s salary. The trick is finding the balance between the effort needed to correct problems with the reward of reclaiming a good employee and the bonus of not having to go through the time, the energy and the expense of replacing them.

I recently read an article about companies to “avoid” when looking for a new job; one listed was companies with a progressive discipline policy. Au contraire, mon cher. A progressive discipline policy is an opportunity to fix a problem before the hammer comes down. The problem with these policies is they’re not used as intended. A progressive discipline policy should really should be called a progressive correction policy. When used appropriately, it provides guidelines to turn around a problem area, and reclaim a productive employee.

Here’s the first thing to consider when wondering if it’s time to terminate: You hired that person because you thought they held promise. Unless they completely misrepresented their skills and expertise, they were likely a productive member of the team at some point. If you could correct the problem and get them back to that place, would it be worthwhile?

Managers complain about having to correct employees. The employees are adults and they know what’s expected of them – why do I have to nag them about problems? It’s uncomfortable! But staff members rightfully read an absence of correction as tacit approval. The unexpected “you’re fired” down the road is often the shocking end-result. Whereas a few simple steps of ownership and correction could have salvaged that staff member, now the revolving door (and costs) of employee turnover begins again.

Let’s take a look at a few types of problem employees and examine whether they should be saved or sacked.

Tardy Theresa

Theresa is habitually late for work. She’s a good worker, but never on time. You’re aggravated that she frequently arrives late to the morning staff meeting and you have to give her separate updates as a result, but she’s really competent at her job. Is it worthwhile to recover this employee?

You give her the stink eye whenever you catch her sneaking in late; you leave notes on her desk to “make an effort to get to work on time,” but you avoid sitting down with her and having a serious conversation because you’re uncomfortable. She promises to do better, and she does, for a few days – then it’s back to tardy town.

For Theresa, progressive discipline could work. Emphasize to her that no matter how good her work, the rules apply to her just like everyone else. If she doesn’t take ownership of her problem and correct it, she will be fired – yes, actually fired! Use your progressive discipline policy and follow the steps: first warning, second warning, third warning, termination.

Now here’s the hard part: you have to stick to it. If Theresa can’t make it on time, then she has to be let go, period. The same policy should apply to any employee who cannot meet the terms of employment. They need to take ownership of their mistakes and accept responsibility for their future employment. If they cannot, then separation is of their own doing. No surprise there.

Fairness is paramount – bad employees really do diminish morale. A study of trust-based relationships and organizational fairness perception, summarized in MIT Sloan Management Review, highlights the need for employee trust. Combining the work of three data models, a team found that when employees experience something divergent from how they expect to be treated (like fairly and equitably), they react strongly. The “expectation-experience gap” can be a precursors to a loss in productivity. One of the authors’ top recommendations: Establish clear rules and implement them consistently and transparently across the organization.

In addition to affecting productivity, Psychology Today reported that employee stress levels can be exacerbated by workplace unfairness. People who believe they are treated unfairly tend to be preoccupied with work-related problems. This can lead to stress-related medical problems like substance abuse or emotional distress, resulting in absenteeism.

So, in Theresa’s case, yes, it is absolutely worthwhile trying correct her tardiness before giving her the pink slip. But if you’ve informed her of the problem, given her several warnings and she continues to be late, be prepared to take the uncomfortable step of firing her. It may be critical to your team’s morale and productivity.

Silent Sam

Sam is painfully afraid of public speaking. He has a great mind and a lot of innovative ideas, but the prospect of voicing them in a crowd – no matter how small – is terrifying. When he is called upon to speak, he stumbles, getting lost in the noise. The team thinks Sam isn’t contributing, and believes they’re carrying him. Resentment gives rise to discord among the team, and you feel you may have to sacrifice him for the greater good.

Can you demand that Sam immediately and permanently get over his fear of public speaking? Considering 75 percent of Americans have speech anxiety, that might be a tall order. You can, however, ease Sam into group discussions with a little effort. You know what the team will be discussing, so meet with Sam beforehand and note his ideas. During the meeting, offer up his insights, crediting that he contributed the ideas in a separate session. If the team has questions, try to answer them yourself, or defer to him if he’s able to respond. As his concepts become part of the zeitgeist, he might find himself more at ease, and better able to contribute.

Afterwards, follow up with Sam privately. Compliment him on his ideas that worked well, or work through the ideas that flopped. Offer him a safe space to share his voice and seize any opportunity to boost his confidence. The effort is designed to bring him on board with the group and raise his level of comfort. It’s worthwhile to take the time and put in the work to salvage a talented employee.

Many good employees with bad habits can be corrected. Turnover is costly and demanding on HR and departments. It’s hard to underestimate the value of employees who know and get company culture, are comfortable and competent with the work, and don’t require training. If an employee has a bad habit that is negatively affecting the team at large, it’s not the employee’s role to identify and address it – it’s the manager’s.

Employees like Theresa and Sam are salvageable, but others aren’t worth the effort. When is it time to fire an employee? Here are some tell-tale signs this one has got to go:

1. Bad behavior is not corrected

Rules are not suggestions. If an employee has had ample time to correct problem issues but does not, they need to pursue other career opportunities.

2. They affect morale

The office bully may have a client list as long as his ego, but the ripple effect of his personality undermines everyone that has to deal with him. You may think you can’t possibly let him go, but consider how morale rises when he’s on vacation. Wouldn’t it be nice if every day was like that? Say bye bye!

3. They’re damaging productivity

Can’t get anything done because “someone” hasn’t completed their part of the project, again? If repeated corrections and progressive consequences haven’t worked, it’s time to find someone who can get the job done.

4. They’re apathetic

If they don’t care about the work, the customer, the company, or their coworkers, why do you care about them? If you can’t turn around their attitude, it’s time to turn them over.

5. They thrive on drama

These employees relish discord. They thrive on office drama, take nourishment from hurt feelings, and diss the company at every opportunity. They start the fight, then sit back to enjoy the show. These are likely personality issues you’re unqualified (if you even wanted to bother) to resolve. Remove the tumor they’ve become and let the healing begin.

6. They carry out major violations

There are some company policies that require immediate and irrevocable discipline in the form of termination. There are no “three strikes and you’re out” for bringing a weapon to the office; no progressive disciplinary steps for theft; nor incremental consequences for showing up to work while abusing substances. Such offenses require immediate dismissal. Bear in mind this doesn’t violate the “no employee should ever be surprised to be fired” rule. They should know the weapon/theft/high policy is in place, know the penalty for violating it, and should be prepared for the consequence they have earned.

7. They’re that one

There’s one final type of employee to terminate as soon as possible: The one that immediately comes to your mind as deserving of being sooo fired. If you’ve given this person endless second chances and spent a lot of time thinking about how/why/when you should let this person go, the chances are they are long overdue.

This is all very well and good, you say, but firing people stinks! It does, but if you do it properly it can be quick and virtually painless for all. Firing someone should take less than 10 minutes. That’s right: A typical separation should take no more than 10 minutes tops.

Here’s how and why:

You’ve made your decision to let someone go. It’s not negotiable. You’ve prepared all the paperwork necessary for their separation: COBRA notifications, checklists for company property to be returned, passwords to be surrendered, information on severance, anything you offer. Call the employee at the last minute at the end of the day to meet with you. Do not send them a meeting request for 4:50 when they arrive at the office at 9. It’s cruel and they’ll spend the day speculating and complaining!

When they arrive, let them know they are being let go. Provide them information and any accompanying paperwork, ask for their property and wish them good luck in their future endeavors. Period. The End.

Do not apologize, do not negotiate. Having a person beg or plead for their job is cruel. Why subject them to that indignity? Let them know that your decision is final: You hope to get them through this process as quickly and painlessly as possible, but there is no negotiation. Tell them you wish them well, but there’s no point in prolonging the meeting, nor damaging their dignity.

Ant that’s it – 99 percent of separations are this easy and smooth. (For the occasionally violent employee, I often had an officer on hand, and luckily in a few cases!) In my experience, people want to leave with their pride intact, and it’s up to you to assure that happens. If you structure your time with them as professionally and tersely as possible, they’ll rise to the occasion.

In my many years in HR I rarely felt guilty for firing someone, unless a manager insisted on letting someone go despite my objections – but hey, you can’t win them all! If an employee knew they were violating policy and chose not to correct the behavior, they were responsible for their fate. If an employee was just toxic or unhappy, I often found the root of their misery was the job, the company, or something internal. Moving on was a good thing for them. Many employees I’ve run into later tell me getting fired was the best thing that happened to them. Getting fired forced them to find a better opportunity, and they were happy and thriving – but they wouldn’t have taken the leap themselves.

Determining the need and time to fire an employee is difficult but necessary – not only for your company, but often for your employees themselves. When it’s time to terminate, make it quick and painless – but make it happen.

Photo: Patrik Nygren

The post When (and How) to Fire an Employee: 7 Signs it’s Time to Terminate appeared first on Recruiterbox Blog.

Source: Erin Engstrom

The following two tabs change content below.
Erin Engstrom does outreach and marketing for Recruiterbox, a recruitment software that helps small- and medium-sized businesses ditch email and spreadsheets and conduct all their hiring activities from a single, easy-to-use system.

Erin Engstrom

Erin Engstrom does outreach and marketing for Recruiterbox, a recruitment software that helps small- and medium-sized businesses ditch email and spreadsheets and conduct all their hiring activities from a single, easy-to-use system.

erin-engstrom has 39 posts and counting.See all posts by erin-engstrom

Leave a Reply